The first truly comprehensive insider's guide for foreign residents The website is under beta testing.

Test
Labeled products are not for sale.

Promotion

  • Vietnamese law allows for foreigners to adopt Vietnamese children under certain conditions.

    Disclaimer on Legal Documents Published on Atexpats The direct translations of Vietnamese legal bulletins and laws published on this website are not in themselves official documents, and are provided for educational and reference purposes only. While these versions are believed to be relatively accurate, Atexpats is not a legal agency and is not licensed nor qualified to interpret Vietnamese law in any official capacity. For the most accurate legal information, please consult with a registered law firm. Highlighting and summarial overviews of these laws contained in this article are observations added by Atexpats in order to draw readers’ attention to clauses that may be relevant to foreigners and are not intended as interpretations or guides. Atexpats may not be held liable for the actions of any individual or entity based on this information. This Law provides the principles and conditions for adoption; competence, order and procedures for settling adoptions; rights and obligations of adoptive parents, adopted children and natural parents; and responsibilities of agencies and organizations in adoption. Adoption aims to establish permanent parent and child relationships in the best interests of adopted persons, ensuring that adopted persons are nurtured, cared for and educated in the family environment. In this Law. the titles below are construed as follows: The State protects the right to adopt and the right to be adopted in accordance with this Law and relevant laws. The State encourages organisations and individuals to provide humanitarian assistance for the nurture, care for and education of children in disadvantaged circumstances. Humanitarian assistance must not affect adoption. The Government shall stipulate the receipt, management and use of humanitarian assistance referred to in this Article. People's Courts are competent to settle requests for titleination of adoption in accordance with the law on civil procedures. Vietnamese citizens who seek and are eligible to adopt a child under this Law but cannot find a child yet for adoption shall register their adoption needs with the provincial-level Justice Departments of the places in which they permanently reside; if having a child for adoption, the provincial-level Justice Department shall introduce the prospective adoptive person to the commune-level People's Committee of the place in which the child permanently resides for consideration and settlement.

  • Your friendly government guide to PIT.

    Disclaimer on Legal Documents Published on Atexpats The direct translations of Vietnamese legal bulletins and laws published on this website are not in themselves official documents, and are provided for educational and reference purposes only. While these versions are believed to be relatively accurate, Atexpats is not a legal agency and is not licensed nor qualified to interpret Vietnamese law in any official capacity. For the most accurate legal information, please consult with a registered law firm. Highlighting and summaries of these laws contained in this article are observations added by Atexpats in order to draw readers’ attention to clauses that may be relevant to foreigners and are not intended as interpretations or guides. Atexpats may not be held liable for the actions of any individual or entity based on this information. ON THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE LAW ON PERSONAL INCOME TAX, THE LAW ON THE AMENDMENTS TO THE LAW ON PERSONAL INCOME TAX, AND THE GOVERNMENT'S DECREE NO. 65/2013/NĐ-CP ELABORATING A NUMBER OF ARTICLES OF THE LAW ON PERSONAL INCOME TAX AND THE LAW ON THE AMENDMENTS TO THE LAW ON PERSONAL INCOME TAX Pursuant to the Law on Personal income tax No. 04/2007/QH12 dated November 21, 2007; Pursuant to the Law on the amendments to the Law on Personal income tax No. 26/2012/QH13 dated November 22, 2012; Pursuant to the Law on Tax administration No. 78/2006/QH11 dated November 29, 2006; Pursuant to the Law on the amendments to the Law on Tax administration No. 21/2012/QH13 dated November 20, 2012; Pursuant to the Government's Decree No. 65/2013/NĐ-CP dated June 27, 2013 elaborating a number of articles of the Law on Personal income tax and the Law on the amendments to the Law on Personal income tax; Pursuant to the Government's Decree No. 83/2013/NĐ-CP dated June 22, 2013 elaborating a number of articles of the Law on Tax administration

  • How to get there and where to stay

    Hoi An is a major holiday destination, so make your travel arrangements at least a month before the departure date to avoid disappointment. If you’re planning to travel during the high season (including Lunar New Year), it’s best to finalise all the details of your trip up to two months before you leave Ho Chi Minh City. The best time to go to Hoi An is between February and April, when the weather is warm and sunny. Avoid travelling during the rainy season (generally from August to January) unless you want to spend most of your vacation stuck at the hotel. Also, try to plan your trip so that you are in Hoi An for its traditional lantern festival that takes place on the 14th day of the lunar month. The fastest way to get into Hoi An is by plane . The nearest airport is in Da Nang, which is about a 30-40 minute drive from Hoi An. VietJetAir (3827 0404 | 164 Le Thanh Ton, Dist. 1) and Jetstar (3845 0092 | 12 Hong Ha, Tan Binh) both operate multiple flights per day. The flight takes around an hour, and air tickets cost between VND500,000-1,500,000. The cheapest way to book is directly from the airline’s website. Taxi rates for the transfer to Hoi An vary wildly depending on how much the driver thinks he can get away with charging you, so it’s best to call your hotel and arrange for pick-up from the airport (VND200K-250K). Travelling by train is a good option if you’re not pressed for time and want to enjoy the scenery. The nearest train station is in Da Nang, and it takes 17-20 hours to get there from here. The SE2 train leaves HCMC at 7:30pm and arrives at around noon the following day. The SE4 train leaves at 10pm and arrives at 2pm the next day. One way tickets are around VND600K for a soft seat, and between VND 800K-1M for a sleeper berth. The cheapest place to book a ticket is at the city centre ticket office in Saigon (275C Pham Ngu Lao, Dist. 1).

  • Getting illustrated doesn’t have to be forever.

    Since ancient times, the henna plant has been used to make a special paste to colour hair, fingernails, and skin for women (and sometimes men) as well as leather, silk and wool. Henna tattoos are temporary skin designs made using henna paste products that resemble real tattoos and then fade away. Sometimes called mehndi , henna has a brown colour and lasts for two to four weeks after applying the dye, depending on how good the paste is and on the skin condition of the recipient. A mehndi may take from five to ten minutes to finish for a small area such as the palms, wrists, or feet. Henna is grown in both South Asia and Africa, although it’s most commonly associated with the culture of India, where henna tattoos are popular among girls – especially dancers who use it adorn themselves in celebrations and holidays. The tattoo is regarded as bringing blessings, luck, joy, and accentuating beauty. Henna is applied on a bride to wish her luck and happiness, and it’s believed that the longer that the henna remains visible, the happier the couple will be. It’s also used on pregnant women’s bellies to bless both mother and child. Henna is known to be longer lasting if well-preserved, usually best accomplished by avoiding direct contact with soap. A mixture of lemon essence and sugar will make it brighter and harder to fade. After the henna has been applied, let it dry naturally over a few hours (or ideally, through the night) and avoid using fans during that time. It has a dark brown or green-grey colour just after being applied, and becomes red-brown when it dries. Here in Saigon, the henna fashion was first imported by a small group of body painting enthusiasts who managed to kick off a trend within a year. As it causes no harm to the skin and doesn’t hurt at all, henna has attracted many locals, regardless of gender, to try it out.

  • A brief overview of some of the considerations you’ll need to make as an expat parent.

    Choosing an International School for your child is one of the most difficult, expensive, and time-consuming exercises you’ll have to face as an expat. When it comes to choosing which amongst Saigon’s international schools you’re eventually going to settle on, you’ll need to be aware first of the criteria that distinguish between them. These are by no means straightforward, and the following checklist is far from exhaustive:       Which international syllabus is offered, and at which grade levels What universities your child will be eligible or best prepared for once he or she graduates What accreditation the school has What specific qualifications are awarded by the school When the beginning of the school year is, how long the terms are, and when holidays are scheduled Between which hours of the day classes are held Which language(s) classes are conducted in Which academic subjects are prioritised, and what is the general academic focus Which teaching philosophies bear on the instruction method How much personal attention your child can expect to receive How much the fees cost, and what other expenses will be involved How meals will be provided, and whether your child will have any special dietary requirements met How easily your child will be able to pass across to another schooling system, or back to the system of your home country What is the ratio of local students to foreign students, and which nationalities is your child likely to be studying with Will your child be eligible to enroll, and how long it will take to secure a place at the school The availability of after school services and extracurricular activities Whether or not the school has a parentteacher organisation Whether or not the school is involved in any community immersion programmes, such as local visits and charity

Fruit in Season

Real Estate
  • Profile
  • View Posts
  • Blog
  • Send email