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  • How to get there and where to stay

    Hoi An is a major holiday destination, so make your travel arrangements at least a month before the departure date to avoid disappointment. If you’re planning to travel during the high season (including Lunar New Year), it’s best to finalise all the details of your trip up to two months before you leave Ho Chi Minh City. The best time to go to Hoi An is between February and April, when the weather is warm and sunny. Avoid travelling during the rainy season (generally from August to January) unless you want to spend most of your vacation stuck at the hotel. Also, try to plan your trip so that you are in Hoi An for its traditional lantern festival that takes place on the 14th day of the lunar month. The fastest way to get into Hoi An is by plane . The nearest airport is in Da Nang, which is about a 30-40 minute drive from Hoi An. VietJetAir (3827 0404 | 164 Le Thanh Ton, Dist. 1) and Jetstar (3845 0092 | 12 Hong Ha, Tan Binh) both operate multiple flights per day. The flight takes around an hour, and air tickets cost between VND500,000-1,500,000. The cheapest way to book is directly from the airline’s website. Taxi rates for the transfer to Hoi An vary wildly depending on how much the driver thinks he can get away with charging you, so it’s best to call your hotel and arrange for pick-up from the airport (VND200K-250K). Travelling by train is a good option if you’re not pressed for time and want to enjoy the scenery. The nearest train station is in Da Nang, and it takes 17-20 hours to get there from here. The SE2 train leaves HCMC at 7:30pm and arrives at around noon the following day. The SE4 train leaves at 10pm and arrives at 2pm the next day. One way tickets are around VND600K for a soft seat, and between VND 800K-1M for a sleeper berth. The cheapest place to book a ticket is at the city centre ticket office in Saigon (275C Pham Ngu Lao, Dist. 1).

  • Picking up a local tutor may require a different approach than you’re used to.

    People’s attitudes about private tutors depend a lot on where they’re from. Expats from countries with a highly competitive education system will tend to see tutors as a normal part of a child’s learning experience, and for them, living in Ho Chi Minh City will certainly involve identifying suitable tutors for their own children’s needs. For other expats with less intense educational backgrounds, the sight of their neighbours’ kids stuck with additional work outside of normal school hours will seem unfair. Needless to say, tutors do feature in Vietnamese academic culture, and there are a number of avenues to investigate if you’re looking for one. Many Vietnamese families primarily focus on university students and recent graduates for tutoring services. Thoroughly drilled in contemporary academic subjects, Vietnamese students are known to be particularly competent in science and math – and generally charge very low tuition fees. For expats who speak English only, it’s harder to identify a suitable candidate, as you’re limited to the small subset of students who speak English fluently enough to be effective in teaching. Finding a tutor meeting your specifications, however, isn’t impossible given that HCMC’s major universities run specialised job support centres dedicated to placing students in work. These centres usually have a large database of potentials from which they can make recommendations, and will also allow you to post an announcement on their jobs board without charge. Try the Vietnamese-language jobsearch centre for the University of Social Sciences and Humanities (10-12 Dinh Tien Hoang, Dist. 1 | 6675 3567 | cv.ussh@gmail.com ), which educates a number of exchange students. For general subjects, this is an affordable and quite convenient way to set your kid up with a tutor – but you’re likely to be overloaded with candidates if you do try a student centre. Working with a foreign family is a prime gig for a struggling local tertiary student here, so there’ll be no shortage of interest.

  • If you’re married to a Vietnamese national, you’re eligible to stay here permanently.

    For any foreigner with serious ties to Vietnam, the whole rigmarole of relying on hard-won temporary visas and permits can be frustrating. For those in this situation, there can be no more convenient solution than obtaining Permanent Residency status. A Permanent Residence Card is the solution for people who wish to regularly visit or stay in Vietnam for extended periods. It is perfect for those who wish to retire in Vietnam and for others who want to stay long-term without a work permit – the card functions as an unlimited visa and as a work permit too. Generally, however, the only expats eligible for permanent residency are the spouses, children, or parents (and not parents-in-law) of Vietnamese citizens permanently residing in Vietnam. The only people who fit into the other eligible categories have to be truly extraordinary: If you fall into either of those categories, pat yourself on the back for being amazing, and read on to find out how to get your residency. A Permanent Residence Card in no way implies official Vietnamese citizenship, although it holds equal legal weight. Therefore, it’s not nearly as permanent as the name implies. Beyond its lengthy and complicated application process, maintaining a Permanent Residence card is relatively simple, less time-consuming, and far cheaper compared to the other methods of remaining in Vietnam, such as the Work Permit + Business Visa/ Temporary Residence Card/ Five Years Visa Exemption/ APEC, ASEA, or other international union visa cards. While Permanent Residence cards have unlimited validity, they must be updated every 3 years. The cardholder can always use this card as an unlimited visa to come to Vietnam. The following documents are required when applying for a permanent residence card: The above documents (except for application for the official Vietnamese ones – permanent residence, diplomatic note, passport, visa) must be translated into Vietnamese and certified or legalized as regulated. They should then be submitted to the local immigration office.

  • Tying the knot and keeping it together – by law.

    Disclaimer on Legal Documents Published on Atexpats The direct translations of Vietnamese legal bulletins and laws published on this website are not in themselves official documents, and are provided for educational and reference purposes only. While these versions are believed to be relatively accurate, Atexpats is not a legal agency and is not licensed nor qualified to interpret Vietnamese law in any official capacity. For the most accurate legal information, please consult with a registered law firm. Highlighting and summarial overviews of these laws contained in this article are observations added by Atexpats in order to draw readers’ attention to clauses that may be relevant to foreigners and are not intended as interpretations or guides. Atexpats may not be held liable for the actions of any individual or entity based on this information. This Law prescribes the marriage and family regime, legal standards for conduct by family members; responsibilities of individuals, organisations, the State and society in the building and consolidation of the marriage and family regime. In this Law, the terms below are construed as follows: For cases not prescribed by this Law, provisions of the Civil Code and other laws related to marriage and family relations may apply to marriage and family relations. For a marriage which is registered ultra vires, a competent state agency shall, upon request, withdraw and cancel the marriage certificate in accordance with the civil status law and request two partners to re-register their marriage with a competent state agency. In this case, the marriage relation shall be established on the date of the previous marriage registration. Rights and obligations between a man and woman cohabiting as husband and wife and their children must comply with this Law’s provisions on rights and obligations of parents and children. Husband and wife are equal, having equal rights and obligations in all family affairs and in the performance of citizens’ rights and obligations prescribed in the Constitution, this Law and relevant laws.

  • Your friendly government guide to PIT.

    Disclaimer on Legal Documents Published on Atexpats The direct translations of Vietnamese legal bulletins and laws published on this website are not in themselves official documents, and are provided for educational and reference purposes only. While these versions are believed to be relatively accurate, Atexpats is not a legal agency and is not licensed nor qualified to interpret Vietnamese law in any official capacity. For the most accurate legal information, please consult with a registered law firm. Highlighting and summaries of these laws contained in this article are observations added by Atexpats in order to draw readers’ attention to clauses that may be relevant to foreigners and are not intended as interpretations or guides. Atexpats may not be held liable for the actions of any individual or entity based on this information. ON THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE LAW ON PERSONAL INCOME TAX, THE LAW ON THE AMENDMENTS TO THE LAW ON PERSONAL INCOME TAX, AND THE GOVERNMENT'S DECREE NO. 65/2013/NĐ-CP ELABORATING A NUMBER OF ARTICLES OF THE LAW ON PERSONAL INCOME TAX AND THE LAW ON THE AMENDMENTS TO THE LAW ON PERSONAL INCOME TAX Pursuant to the Law on Personal income tax No. 04/2007/QH12 dated November 21, 2007; Pursuant to the Law on the amendments to the Law on Personal income tax No. 26/2012/QH13 dated November 22, 2012; Pursuant to the Law on Tax administration No. 78/2006/QH11 dated November 29, 2006; Pursuant to the Law on the amendments to the Law on Tax administration No. 21/2012/QH13 dated November 20, 2012; Pursuant to the Government's Decree No. 65/2013/NĐ-CP dated June 27, 2013 elaborating a number of articles of the Law on Personal income tax and the Law on the amendments to the Law on Personal income tax; Pursuant to the Government's Decree No. 83/2013/NĐ-CP dated June 22, 2013 elaborating a number of articles of the Law on Tax administration

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